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Exploring Human Dimensions: Stephen Archer

Queen’s University, Office of the Vice-Principal (Research), Spring 2014

Heart to Heart

In his day-to-day life, Dr. Stephen Archer wears two hats – two extremely large and important ones. On the administrative side, Dr. Archer is the Head of Medicine at Queen’s and affiliate hospitals. With 13 divisions, Medicine is the largest department in the Faculty of Health Sciences. He expertly balances this with his role as an internationally-respected clinician scientist and cardiologist who has made discoveries in oxygen sensing, mitochondrial dynamics, and new therapies for pulmonary hypertension and lung cancer.

Recently, Karen Richardson sat down with Dr. Archer to discuss his research successes and how he is working to promote medical innovation and ensure that Kingston elevates its international profile in medicine, research and education.

 

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Technological Disruption and the Danger of “Dusty Ideas”

Published in Social Media Week, September 2013

Is your idea or your industry “dusty”? Will a new trend in technology come along and affect your industry and turn the idea and product you are using into a “Kodak”?

“You and your future industries have dusty ideas. They’re there — whether you recognize it or not,” said Paul Barter. As VP of Research at T4G Limited and a Technology Strategy Professor, he works with business unit leaders to determine the current and future state of the market.

Technology is taking off at an “exponential rate” and new trends will affect the day-to-day lives of individuals and corporations, he said. “Technology is on an exponential curve — it’s taking off. The power of exponential growth means it’s changing really quickly.”

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Elective C-sections may not be optional

Published in The Medical Post, March 2004

OTTAWA – For patients inquiring about C-sections, ob/gyns may need to reinforce the message that for most women vaginal delivery poses a lower risk, said Dr. Jan Christilaw, a past-president of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Canada (SOGC).

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Morning sickness: Ginger can reduce morning sickness in mothers-to-be

Published in The Medical Post, January 2003

ADELAIDE, AUSTRALIA – Ginger is just as effective as vitamin B6 in reducing nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy, according to new research published in the April issue of Obstetrics & Gyneco

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Conditions in Pregnancy: Women cautioned about advisory from Health Canada

Published in The Medical Post, 2003

Experts concerned pregnant patients may overreact to antidepressant warning issued

TORONTO – Canadian experts are concerned about pregnant women being treated for depression who may hastily stop antidepressant use following the release this month of a Health Canada advisory on the potential adverse effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and other antidepressants on newborns.

“Under no circumstances should women be tapered off or stopped ‘cold turkey’ in pregnancy if they really need their medication,” said Dr. Gideon Koren, director of the Motherisk Program at the Hospital for Sick Children here.

The advisory applies to bupropion, citalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, mirtazapine, paroxetine, sertraline and venlafaxine, and suggests the danger is greatest when women take newer antidepressants during the third trimester of pregnancy.

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Recruit Your Media-Savvy Gen-Ys

Published in Your Workplace, September 2011

Gen Ys (or “Millenials”), known as those born between the mid 1970s to the early 2000s, are a valuable asset to any organization. They are keen, talented, energetic and tech-savvy. As you will likely hire them in the upcoming years, you need to “market your jobs like a media buyer,” says Kim Peters, founder of Workopolis, Past-President of Eluta.ca, and the current President of Net Advertising Solutions. Peters showed some dynamic examples of companies using social media to attract talent (check out Cirque du Soleil’s recruitment video posted on our blog at www.yourworkplace.ca).

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What Makes Microsoft Canada a #1 Place to Work? President Eric Gales reveals the keys to their success

Published in Your Workplace, May 2011

What makes a great workplace?

Being a great workplace has to start with leadership. There is a philosophical acknowledgement in our company that we know that every employee has a choice about where he or she works.Therefore we need to work hard to be that choice.We need to understand what we need to do to create a great environment.We want the best people to come work for us and we want the best people to do the best work they can. And that fundamentally requires leadership from the top down.

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Best Workplaces

Published in Your Workplace, October 2011

What makes an “attractive”, healthy employer?

BlackBerry maker Research in Motion Ltd was awarded “most attractive employer” by the recruitment firm Randstad Canada last week. RIM topped six of the 10 “attractiveness categories”, including pleasant work atmosphere, career progression and quality training. “It’s exciting to see Canadians recognize companies that focus on the future,” Randstad Canada president Jan Hein Bax stated in a release.

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Bridging the Gap

Published in Kingston Life, Nov/Dec 2012

When David Girard initially moved to Kingston to pursue an MBA at Queen’s School of Business, he had no plans to stay here after graduation. Nor did he plan to find a job in the city after completing his program. But when he graduated on a Friday this past April, he began work the following Monday as a project manager of the Cancer Program at Kingston General Hospital.

“We didn’t realize it, but it kind of snuck up on us that we liked the city,” says Girard, 30, who is originally from Mississauga, Ontario. “The idea of going back to a big, busy city, after coming from one — my heart wasn’t in it. As it came towards the end of my year at Queen’s, my partner, Lyndsay, and I realized we had come to like Kingston.”

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e-talk: Balance in a wireless world

Published in Kingston Life, May 2008

Are you a crackberry?

The term, coined by work-life balance expert Linda Druxbury of Carleton University’s Sprott School of Business, is used to describe those among us who are addicted to our wireless e-mail devices, cell phones and other technologies that allow us to work anywhere, anytime.

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Breaking the Silence

Published in Queen's Alumni Review, January 2008

Jane Hall, Artsci ’76, Ed ’77, one of the first women to join the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) in the 1970s, still recalls her first arrest. It happened in North Vancouver when she stopped an impaired driver. The man was surprised to see that the officer approaching his car was a young woman. Before he knew what had hit him, Jane had slapped a pair of handcuffs on him and he was in the back seat of her patrol car. It was only later that Jane discovered she’d arrested one of the nastiest criminals on the North Shore.

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Disney Online Studios Canada

Published in Your Workplace, May 2011

Phenomenal success, international growth, passionate employees, an incredible workplace culture and an award-winning workplace—how do they do it? Disney Online Studios Canada has become part of one of the largest entertainment companies in the world.

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Conference 2011!

Published in Your Workplace, May 2011

Our annual conference this year was an inspiring and informative one, full of top-notch speakers from leading organizations. “Magnetize yourself through your story,” “keep your flame burning brightly”, “be a partner”, “assume a Gen-Y state of mind” and “train to win” were just some of the entertaining words of wisdom from motivational speaker Mike Lipkin, President of Environics/Lipkin.

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Bone mineral density tests now standardized

Published in The Medical Post, March 2004

HAMILTON – The Canadian panel of the International Society of Densitometry has developed standards for the appropriate use of bone mineral density testing (BMD) in premenopausal women, men and children.

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